ARABIAN NIGHTS STORY BOOK

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One Thousand and One Nights is a collection of Middle Eastern folk tales compiled in Arabic during the Islamic Golden Age. It is often known in English as the Arabian Nights, from the first English-language edition (c. – c. ), which rendered the title as The Arabian Nights' Entertainment. 1, Nights, also known as The Thousand and One Nights or Arabian Nights, is a collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian folk tales that. β€œIs it possible, that by telling these tales, one might indeed save one's self?” The character, Scheherezade thought so. In fact, she tells each of the Arabian Nights .


Arabian Nights Story Book

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The collection of Arabian Nights Stories is the most famous literary product of a classical Islamic Civilization that was formed through a merging of Arabic culture . "The Arabian Nights" is a magnificent collection of ancient tales told by the sultana Scheherazade, who relates them as entertainment for her jealous and. The stories are told over a period of one thousand and one nights, and every night she . as an arab, (THIS BOOK IS ARABIAN NOT PERSIAN) i love this book. i.

One day, when Ali Baba was in the forest, and had just cut wood enough to load his asses, he saw at a distance a great cloud of dust, which seemed to approach him. He observed it with attention, and distinguished soon after a body of horsemen, whom he suspected might be robbers. He determined to leave his asses to save himself. He climbed up a large tree, planted on a high rock, whose branches were thick enough to conceal him, and yet enabled him to see all that passed without being discovered.

The troop, who were to the number of forty, all well mounted and armed, came to the foot of the rock on which the tree stood, and there dismounted. Every man unbridled his horse, tied him to some shrub, and hung about his neck a bag of corn which they brought behind them. Then each of them took off his saddle-bag, which seemed to Ali Baba to be full of gold and silver from its weight. He was very poor. He could hardly, by his daily labor, maintain himself and his family, which consisted only of his wife and a son.

His son, who was called Aladdin, was a very careless and idle fellow. He was disobedient to his father and mother, and would go out early in the morning and stay out all day, playing in the streets and public places with idle children of his own age.

Mustapha chastised him; but Aladdin was incorrigible, and his father, to his great grief, was forced to abandon him to his idleness, and was so much troubled about him that he fell sick and died in a few months.

It's well worth it!

View 1 comment. Oct 14, Henry Martin rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Tales from the Arabian Nights is probably the finest example of what a magical narrative should be.

If I had to categorize this collection of tales, I would not call them fairy tales, but rather magical tales. Since almost everyone is familiar with the premise behind these stories, I shall not go into detail concerning the backdrop for this fine collection. Rather, I shall express my opinion about them. Aside from the impact these tales once introduced in Europe had on the western literary The Tales from the Arabian Nights is probably the finest example of what a magical narrative should be.

Aside from the impact these tales once introduced in Europe had on the western literary tradition, they continue to entertain generation after generation of readers the world over. Unlike many passing narratives, The Tales from the Arabian Nights remain timeless, for in their core they portray human nature perhaps better than any other similar collection.

They can be enjoyed by readers both young and old, new and experienced, and even the returning reader is sure to find some new experience, some overlooked detail, or a new lesson.

For, in reality, these tales are lessons about humanity. Within Scheherazade's narrative are woven magical lands, mysterious creatures, powerful rulers, and humble commoners.

Above all, there are lessons. Lessons about us, lessons about the human nature with all its imperfections. Yes, as it is with most tales, there is justice, but the justice in this book is not always just, the rulers are often wrong, and the wrongdoers sometimes escape their punishment.

And such is, and has been, our world.

Shahryar and Scheherazade

But there is an inherent hope that all will turn out well, that the evil will receive, in due time, its punishment, and that the victims will be recognized and treated as such.

And that is the same hope we have to hold onto even in our times, because our world is not that different from the world of Scheherazade.

We may have replaced sultans with presidents, dervishes with priests, and camels with wheeled vehicles. Nevertheless, we remain flawed.

View all 5 comments. Great book. Not one that can be read in one sitting, though. I really like the form of narrative, with a story leading into or encompassing another story.

Most of this book is like onion layers. You really do want to have a bookmark handy if you put this one down. This was Scheherazade's tactic to keep King Shahryar's attention so that he couldn't have her executed the next morning.

The 10 Greatest Stories From 1,001 Nights

He was a very insane man who hated women to the degree that he would marry a virgin and have her killed the next m Great book. He was a very insane man who hated women to the degree that he would marry a virgin and have her killed the next morning.

Fortunately Scheherazade was a very clever woman with a gift for fantastic storytelling. Her plan worked splendidly, as nights passed and she was still living.

If you are a fan of fairy tales, but haven't really diverted away from the European ones quite yet, this is a good stepping stone. They are filled with the exotic and mystical appeal of the East, but are similar enough to the European tales to maintain that fairy tale appeal.

I'm sure that most people are familiar with some of the staples: Sinbad, Aladdin, Ali Baba, but there are other, less popular, but just as good or better stories in the Arabian Nights that it was a joy to discover for the first time.

Illustrated Arabian Nights

This is a shorter version of the Arabian Nights. A good place to start for a beginner or a person with a short attention span I tend to be like the latter at times. I intend to read the full-length version. It may take me a while, but it gives me something to look forward to. Definitely delve into the Arabian Nights. You won't be sorry when you do. View 2 comments. It can very interesting to learn about the Arabic culture.

In the book some of the stories have very hard words like in the story. Aladdin and the magic lamp it has very hard words such as, scapegrace, befel, And much more words like that and some of the words come from the Arabic language. The dialogue was realistic some of the stories were fiction. Like It can very interesting to learn about the Arabic culture. Like there is no real magic lamp so you know it's not a real story.

The type of people that would enjoy this book is if they like books with little stories in side. And this book is more towards teens and adults. People that like learning about new places may also like this book.

Feb 02, Erica rated it liked it. Interesting stories but very dated of course, with male dominated themes and some racism that just make you want to roll your eyes. And a few stories have parts that make no sense or aren't really explained.

But I read it since the stories of the Arabian Nights are considered a classic. This edition had a good selection of stories but one story, "Story of the Three Calenders, Sons of Kings, and of Five Ladies of Bagdad" omitted the last part of the story for no apparent reason and I had to look Interesting stories but very dated of course, with male dominated themes and some racism that just make you want to roll your eyes.

This edition had a good selection of stories but one story, "Story of the Three Calenders, Sons of Kings, and of Five Ladies of Bagdad" omitted the last part of the story for no apparent reason and I had to look it up online to read it. So I wouldn't recommend this particular edition. Aug 22, Maggie rated it really liked it. An interesting compilation of fables. Typical of its genre in that they are not exactly happy little tales, though most end well.

I found it interesting that many of them were connected from fable to fable. That made it difficult to put the book down at the end of the story.

My favorite was Aladdin, though I was surprised that it took place in China. An enjoyable compilation of various iconic fairy tales.

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Probably one aspect I enjoyed the most was the use of the initial frame narrative and frequent use of stories begetting other stories. Still, I wish the initial frame narrative did come to a conclusion and complete the book.

Nov 23, sara rated it it was amazing. Dec 12, Gus rated it liked it. What a fun read! Feb 23, Jeff rated it really liked it. This was my first time--late to the game--reading this and I was largely delighted all the way through. Sure, it's full of absolutely no-way happenstance and wild imaginative scenarios, but I don't think it was meant to be realistic. In fact, as a hodgepodge of different Middle Eastern cultures' lores spread throughout time, it's difficult to think of it as any one thing.

Still, what struck me most was how the cautionary tales of love and greed in cultures the West often does not understand inti This was my first time--late to the game--reading this and I was largely delighted all the way through. Still, what struck me most was how the cautionary tales of love and greed in cultures the West often does not understand intimately, pervade as themes in Western writing as well. In other words, the Tales, as myths of the Human Condition, translate pretty well.

May 01, Lynn rated it liked it. These are selected tales from the Arabian Nights. They are short stories and very interesting. I have not read the Arabian Nights, so I cannot compare this to it. This book is based on the Galland French version of the tales. It took out longer sections, verses and tales that might not appeal to anyone. This book then shortened those a little more and added some drawings of scenes from the story.

It was a fun way to read a short story and then put the book down until I had time to read the next These are selected tales from the Arabian Nights. It was a fun way to read a short story and then put the book down until I had time to read the next one.

Oct 16, Mia rated it really liked it. This book has a lot of stories in it.

Trapped again, the genie pledges to reward the fisherman with a lake full of exotic fish if he is released. The fisherman agrees and sells the fish to the sultan as the genie instructed. When the sultan investigates the lake where the fish came from, he meets a prince who is half stone.

The sultan helps the prince and continues to stay friends with the fisherman. Husayn tells him of visiting Bassorah to present a poem. Husayn went inside a house to ask for a glass of water, and there he met a beautiful woman who confessed her love for a young man who used to pass by the house, but stopped when he saw the woman playing with her slave.

Husayn decides to help her meet him again by taking him a note, but the man refuses to come back.

When he visits the house a year later, however, he finds the two married. They each work to bring the best item to the table, including a magic carpet to ride, a magical tube that shows the viewer his deepest wishes, and a healing apple. After finding the items, the princes hear that Nouronnihar is ill, and rather than fighting over her, they bring all of their items together to save her life.

The tales include shipwrecks, ferocious beasts, the Old Man of the Sea, and other dangers.Al-Rabita Press, Baghdad, But being traditional, just be aware that these are dramatic, exciting t 4.

The Lovers of Bassorah. Ali Baba Presents Treasures to Morgiana. Rating details. Her adventurous stories engage and excite the reader or listener and leave them guessing the conclusion to many of the fables along with maybe learning a few life lessons along the way.

Duban gives the king a magic book just before he is beheaded. English for Students Arabian Nights Stories The collection of Arabian Nights Stories is the most famous literary product of a classical Islamic Civilization that was formed through a merging of Arabic culture especially religion and the great imperial traditions of the eastern Mediterranean and the Persian empire of the Sassanians.